Even CEOs complain about too many meetings

Is anyone satisfied with the amount of meetings in their workday? I can’t think of one, at least among my friends and former colleagues.

Same appears to be true for CEOs, according to a recent study that looked at how CEOs spend their time in an average 55-hour workweek. (I think they also ought to study if that’s really the average time CEOs spend at work.)

Chart showing that CEOs spend 18 hours/week in meetingsYou can see from this infographic (credit: Wall Street Journal) that meetings take up nearly a third of that week. While researchers weren’t surprised by the proportion, they nonetheless noted: “CEOs say they pin for more solo time to think and strategize.”

So many professionals I know have similar sentiments – most complain about having too many meetings.

And, to be honest, I wish I had more. But that’s probably because my job is still fairly new – check back in 6 months and see if I’m still singing the same tune. (Since much of my work – writing and editing – is solitary, I enjoy meetings as a way to interact.)

In the interest of using time better and making meetings more productive (and enjoyable), here are some good articles that offer helpful tips:

My favorite tip: Avoid PowerPoint. Nobody likes to sit through someone reading aloud bullet points on a slide!

About Tom Musbach

I am an experienced writer, editor, and spokesman, and this blog is about my career journey, job-hunting advice, and random musings. The views presented here are solely mine.
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